SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ARTICLES ON MINERALS

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Trace Minerals Chromium: Chromium as a Trace Mineral Nutrient

Chromium is extremely important trace mineral commonly found in therapeutic clays. One of its most vital functions is assisting the body break down sugar by boosting the action of insulin. While it is not specifically known exactly how much chromium an individual should consume on a daily basis, the Food and Nutrition Board of the US Institute of Medicine states that between 0.4 micrograms (for infants) and 45 micrograms (women breastfeeding) be consumed on a daily basis.1 However, the National Academy of Sciences in the United States recommends up to 200 micrograms per day.

Chromium deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance, which increases the probability of cardiovascular disease.2 Utilizing clay internally is often reported to have a positive impact on Type II Diabetes. In twelve out of fifteen controlled studies involving individuals with impaired glucose tolerance, chromium supplementation improved glucose utilization or had measurable benefits on blood lipid profiles.3

Furthermore, individuals diagnosed with Type II Diabetes have been shown to have higher rates of chromium loss than average individuals.4 Chromium is a very important mineral for individuals who are at risk or who have been diagnosed with Type II Diabetes.

According to some research, there may be a link between chromium deficiency and atherosclerosis. According to Alexander G. Schauss, Ph.D, IBR Life Sciences Division in Tacoma , Washington , autopsied individuals who died of heart disease had far in-tissue chromium than normal individuals.5

According to some research, there may be a link between chromium deficiency and atherosclerosis. According to Alexander G. Schauss, Ph.D, IBR Life Sciences Division in Tacoma , Washington , autopsied individuals who died of heart disease had far in-tissue chromium than normal individuals.5
 

References


1. DRI, dietary reference intakes for vitamin A, 2001 Edition, by the Panel on Micronutrients, Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Food and Nutrition Board
2. Lukaski HC. Chromium as a supplement. Annu Rev Nutr. 1999;19:279-302
3. Mertz W. Chromium in human nutrition: a review. J Nutr. 1993;123(4):626-633
4. Morris BW, MacNeil S, Hardisty CA, Heller S, Burgin C, Gray TA. Chromium homeostasis in patients with type II (NIDDM) diabetes. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 1999;13(1-2):57-61
5. Schauss, A.G. Minerals, Trace Elements and Human Health. Life Sciences Press: Tacoma, (WA), 1996